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Making things fool proof

Oregroanian May 13, 2007 page A1: A three page Article entitled –Deceptively dangerous: Why ATV’s keep killing– discusses the problem of the deaths caused by ATV accidents. The stories are all heart rendering and tragic. The article takes the usual stance that ATV’s are the problem. This story has four more parts. Monday: Struggles to make ATV’s less prone to rollover accidents; Tuesday: Why warning labels protect ATV companies, not riders; Wednesday: Backing away from tougher laws. This approach is consistent with the sixties concept that we are all victims, and focuses the responsibility for fixing the problem on others. Blaming others when you spill hot coffee on your lap is not the answer.

The article states that 1/3 of the accidents are children under 16 years old. Some as younger than 5. Does anyone of normal intelligence believe that a child less than five years old should be riding an ATV. As Forest Gump said stupid is as stupid does. Deaths of children below 12 must be the fault of stupid parents. Deaths between 12 and 16 are shared by stupid parents who cannot control their stupid children. Taking safety out of the hands of the individual and placing it on industry or the legislators has never worked. We have air bags and seatbelts in cars and require drivers to take a written and practical test to get a drivers license, but does that stop car accidents and deaths?

The tag line for this article is, “But Baron, a long time rider from Abbottsford, B.C., hasn’t touched her ATV since the day two years ago when her 13-year-old son, Drew Dickson, died at the dunes near Florence. An expert rider who had raced ATV’s and dirt bikes, Drew was closely supervised and wore a helmet and chest plate. But friends found him at the bottom of a sand dune, pinned under his adult size ATV, his neck broken. ‘Drew was wearing all the safety gear,’ his mother said. ‘it didn’t make any difference.”

How closely was he supervised if friends had to find him? The term expert should also include judgment. Safety equipment, laws and regulations are not a substitute for judgment. Apparently nether Drew or his mother exhibited good judgment. The problem isn’t warning labels, and it isn’t making the ATV foolproof. What is really needed is another article on Thursday about why the word fool is part of the word foolproof. How much of this problem is caused by stupid people doing stupid things? It easier to be a victim than it is to face the fact that you made a mistake.



By Carol Blume

http://northpacificresearch.com/blog/



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