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Surprise!

OregroanianMay 17, 2007 page A1: An article entitled –West Nile virus may bite hard this year– states that Oregon Health officials are bracing for what they fear could be a heavy West Nile virus season. … the arrival of West Nile in populous Multnomah County last year coupled with an explosion of cases in Malheur County, signals the possibility of a large-scale outbreak here…” “If we can knock down the number of mosquitoes we ought to be all right.” said Emillo DeBess an epidemiologist.

“Birds and mosquitoes, both play a role in spreading the disease. The birds are bitten and spread the disease for hundreds of miles before they die. The bird population has also been ravished by the spread of the virus, at least 20 species have been studied and all show a drop in population, some as much as 50 percent. The victims or this disease is not limited to birds and humans, and warm-blooded animal is a potential this includes all domestic and wild animals.

The hard truth of the matter is that it is also coupled to the environmentally correct practice of building wetlands. One hundred years ago, the nation was also threatened by mosquito borne diseases and reduced the number of wetlands to solve this problem. Forty years ago, that threat was essentially gone.

The environmental religion, touted wetlands because they help purify water and provided habitat to birds. Sounded like a good idea to them. The environmental movement has force the building of wetlands for over 30 years and we are now back to where we were 100 years ago. Those who do not pay attention to history are doomed to repeat their mistakes. Now we have thousands of new wetlands complete with the birds that spread the disease rapidly through out the country.

To solve this problem we are now applying large amounts of toxic chemicals to the same swamps we built to clean the water. So we are not getting clean water with our swamps, we are getting disease. The flower children of the sixties made some major mistakes and many of the environmental changes generated then are producing problems today. Unfortunately the hardest thing to do is admit error, even in the face of reality. But, the quicker the mistake is recognized the less damage caused by the mistake.



By Emmett Geese

http://northpacificresearch.com/blog/

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